Playdough Symmetry Activity

This simple activity has become an after school staple for us ever since I saw it on @themakermum on Instagram. It’s a nice mental exercise that also includes a level of focus that is calming and almost meditative for my daughter after a crazy day at school. All you do is shape half an image made out of playdough, then have your child finish the other half. Sometimes before I pick up my daughter from school, I’ll set this up and lay a damp paper towel over the top so it doesn’t dry out before she gets to it.

The possibilities are really limitless and you can make whatever image your child is interested in, or stick with seasonal ones, like for Christmas or Halloween.

Taste-Safe Sensory Foam

Sensory play has been a boon to me with a three year age difference between my kids. It’s something they can both have fun with and play in their own way, but they are playing together in the same space, which makes my life immensely easier. I also love for them to experience different sensations, especially my youngest. We play with slimy, messy, gritty, powdery, crunchy, you name it, and I’m always looking for more things to introduce them to and to hold their interest.

I was just about to empty out the liquid in a can of chickpeas (called aquafaba), and I thought about this vegan meringue recipe I wanted to make for my aunt last time she was over, but then it hit me. We could use the chickpea foam for a sensory base! So here is the recipe, which has taken the sensory world by storm!

  • Liquid from a can of chickpeas
  • 1/4 tsp cream of tartar

Whip it at high speed with a hand mixer or stand mixer for 5-7 minutes until stiff peaks.

That’s it! It couldn’t be easier and I love that it uses something you would normally throw away. I’ve seen some beautiful, messy play with this after I shared it on Instagram, and I’m so excited to share it with you all here! Let me know how it goes!

Notes:

  • If you don’t have cream of tartar, you can try a splash of vinegar or lemon. I haven’t tried the foam without it, but it serves to form and stabilize the foam through its acidity.
    A blender will not get the thick, stable foam like a hand or stand mixer, but if it’s the only thing you have, give it a shot!

DIY Patterned Playdough Roller

It really can’t get easier than this. It’s just hot glue on a toilet paper roll. Yeeeeep. Use your fingers to support the roll as you imprint it into playdough, or stick it around a rolling pin if it fits! We’ve made so many variations of this so far, including these mermaid scales and a honeycomb print!

Original idea from @playtime.messy.madness on Instagram!

Bubble Writing with Happi Crafts’ Resin Sprinkle Letters

Practice letter writing with bubbles and sprinkles! This fun activity not only works out little hands by engaging their fine-motor skills, but it also helps with coordination AND encourages ingenuity as use they everyday items in new and interesting ways. This project was inspired by the amazing blog Teach Beside Me and utilizes the wildly popular resin sprinkle letters from Happi Crafts that range from $7 to $80 with lots of design options!

Recommended age is 4+ because it requires a good amount of coordination to pinch and release the balloon to write properly.

Materials

  • Large bowl, plastic bin, or casserole dish
  • Dish Soap
  • Water
  • Balloon
  • Pen or marker with no ink left
  • Duct tape
  • Waterproof letter prompts (can also use any type of letter prompt here, just lay them next to the bowl instead of submerging them if they’re not waterproof.)

Method

  1. Remove the ink chamber in the pen or marker till just the casing is left. Wash all the residual ink away, if any. Leave the casing open at both ends.
  2. Secure the balloon onto the non-writing end of the casing with duct tape.
  3. Add a squirt of dish soap to the bowl and fill with water so bubble form.
  4. If you’re using waterproof letter prompts, put them in the water.
  5. Scoop away excess bubbles if you have too many, then blow up the balloon through the casing.
  6. Instruct or show your child how to pinch and release the opening of the balloon to control the flow of air.
  7. Have them fetch a letter from the bowl, submerge just the tip of the casing, and release some air while drawing the letter!

Discussion

Though this is a very fun activity because every kid would love bubble writing, it also sneaks in a lot of different types of learning. Not only does it support letter forming and recognition, but it also engages fine motor muscles and encourages coordination skills. Since blowing up the balloon is easier with the casing mouthpiece than without, it encourages independence and confidence. Setting up these types of unique activities encourage creative thinking, ingenuity, and resourcefulness.

IKEA Flisat Table to Light Table Hack

This is so simple that I hesitated posting it because, well, you’ll see! But this is by far the easiest way you’ll find to make your Flisat table (or any two plastic bins!) into a light table!


Ok get ready for it. Take a bin and put some fairy lights in there:

Put the other bin on top of it:

You’re all set! Have fun with your new light table! It works like a charm!

Magnetic Slime

This little project feels like something out of a sci-fi, which perhaps is why I love it so much. Add some magnetite powder to your next batch of slime, get a strong rare earth magnet, and your kids (or you) will have a blast making zombie worms and magnet eating monsters- straight out of the movies!

Safety: Do not ingest any part of this project. Do not use any of the materials around small children or children who put things in their mouth. Too much iron is poisonous and it should not be ingested in this form. Rare earth magnets are very strong and can pinch fingers, be careful when using them. Magnets should never be left around small children who could ingest them. Do not use magnets near electronics or credit cards. The magnet in the video has a pulling force of 48 lbs. This was more than sufficient. If you are doing this with kids, do not use a more powerful magnet and only use one magnet at a time to avoid pinched fingers.

Materials

Procedure

  1. In a bowl or cup, dissolve the 1/8 tsp borax in 1/4 cup hot water. Set aside.
  2. To a different bowl, add 1/4 cup glue, 1/4 cup water, and 3 tbs iron oxide powder. Mix well. (Note: The powder will stain skin, so try not touch the iron oxide with your hands at this point, wait until the borax solution is mixed it. If you do get it on your hands, dish soap washes most of it off.)
  3. Slowly add the borax solution to the glue mixture and mix well.
  4. Take the slime out and knead with your hands till it is smooth. If it feels sticky, dip it in the extra liquid in the bowl and knead again.
  5. Start playing with the slime and magnet!

The Science Behind Slime

The glue contains a long molecule called polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). It is a polymer, which is a molecule that contains repeats of a subunit molecule (for example, “A” is a subunit and “AAAAAAAAAAAAAAA” is a polymer of A). Borax (sodium tetraborate) is a small molecule that can stick to parts of the PVA through hydrogen bonds. This means one side of the borate molecule can stick to one strand of PVA, while the other side of the borate can also stick to a different strand of PVA, creating a bridge between the two PVA strands. This is called crosslinking.

Having many crosslinking sites usually makes a polymer more rigid, but the interesting thing about borate/PVA crosslinking is that the bond is transient, meaning it can easily break and reform somewhere else. This causes the slime to act kind of like a liquid and kind of like a solid. If given time, the PVA can ‘flow’ as gravity pulls and breaks the borate/PVA crosslinks. It acts like a slime instead of a true liquid because as the PVA molecules pass by more borate, they can momentarily bond to borate and another strand of PVA, slowing down the flow. If you pull the slime fast, you break all those bonds quickly, allowing the slime to act like a solid momentarily.

The Science Behind Magnetic Slime

The iron oxide powder in the link above is magnetite, which is a natural mineral made of iron and oxygen. Like many iron-containing compounds, it is attracted to a magnet.

The iron oxide particles in the powder will become suspended in your slime matrix. As the particles are attracted to the magnet, they will pull the slime matrix with them, causing a whole section of the slime to move with it. This makes for some really cool effects!


If you’re looking for a project to use some of the leftover ion oxide powder, try our DIY Magnetic Shapes!

Birthday Cloud Dough

Get ready for some soft, colorful, messy, moldable fun! Sprinkles plus cloud dough make for a festive activity, full of problem solving, sensory stimulation, basic engineering, and more!

Materials

  • Flour
  • Oil (any taste-safe liquid oil will do, like canola or rice bran oil)
  • Sprinkles
  • Plastic bin or cookie sheet
  • Various toys
    • Molding cups
    • Candles
    • Spoons
    • Ice cream scoop

Method

  1. Mix 4 cups flour with 1/2 cup oil. Rake with a fork or fingers till well blended.
  2. Mix in 1/2 cup of sprinkles.
  3. Dump in a bin or cookie sheet and let them go at it!

This is quite messy and will probably get all over your kids clothes and the floor. Luckily, it sweeps up easily and comes right off in the washing machine.

Birthday cloud dough